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Dr. Lisa Witherspoon continues sharing technology’s role in physical education. In the past Webinar, Technology in Physical Education (Part 1), Witherspoon instructed that technology should and can be used as a beneficial tool in physical education. Yet, it can be overwhelming to decide what equipment is best for your class among the various options available. Witherspoon offers a guide of what you should consider while choosing technology for your class, making the process simpler!

  1. Quality VS. Quantity

It’s important to remember that more technology is not necessarily better. Technology breaks down; buying durable equipment helps it last longer. You should also choose technology that is multi-purposeful, having the ability to be implemented in stations or multiple units.

  1. Cost Effective

There are many free or cheap apps available and plenty of them are beneficial. This saves money and offers students the opportunity to work independently. It is important to remember that some forms of technology require batteries and other extra expenses, which you will have to keep up with.

  1. Space Allocation

Do you have the space for the equipment you want to buy? Storage and transportation are huge steps towards purchasing technology. Some of the equipment offered requires a permanent space, such as being mounted on a wall. Others can be moved out of gymnasiums with rolling carts.

  1. What is the Benefit?

Most importantly, choose technology that will best help your class learn your class objectives. Technology should be effective and efficient, maximizing time and helping students to learn. Also, keep your students safe by planning how they can be active around possible chords. 

Witherspoon understands that financial constraints are common for physical education departments. Taking the initiative to search for grants, fundraise, and seek help from your community can all help you afford the best technology, keeping your students active and learning!

Webinar Presenter: Dr. Lisa Witherspoon is an Assistant Professor at the University of South Florida. She is the Director of the USF Active Gaming Research Laboratories and an international expert in technology driven games and exercise. She has helped young athletes gain skills and confidence through various basketball camps, which she has designed and implemented throughout the country.

Professional Development Content

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Lisa Witherspoon

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Professional Development Includes

  • 1 Webinar
  • Professional Development Certificate